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What Makes Good Green Tea?

Green tea is a popular beverage enjoyed by people all over the world. It is known for its refreshing taste, health benefits, and variety of flavors. But what makes good green tea?

Here are some key characteristics of good green tea:

  • Appearance: Good green tea leaves are tightly rolled, uniform in size, and have a fresh green or yellow-green color. The leaves should also be smooth and tender.
  • Aroma: Good green tea has a refreshing, delicate aroma with notes of chestnut, young chestnut, and flowers.
  • Flavor: Good green tea has a refreshing, sweet flavor with a long-lasting aftertaste. It often has a "green bean soup" or "chestnut" flavor.
  • Durability: Good green tea is durable and can be brewed multiple times without losing its flavor. The tea leaves retain their color and flavor even after repeated brewing.

In addition to these characteristics, good green tea is also typically grown in a favorable climate and soil environment. It is also often made from high-quality tea leaves and processed using traditional methods that preserve the tea's natural flavor.

Of course, what makes good green tea is also a matter of personal preference. Some people may prefer a stronger flavor, while others may prefer a more delicate flavor. Ultimately, the best way to find out what you like is to experiment with different types of green tea.

Here are some tips for choosing good green tea:

  • Look at the appearance: Good green tea leaves should be tightly rolled, uniform in size, and have a fresh green or yellow-green color.
  • Smell the aroma: Good green tea has a refreshing, delicate aroma with notes of chestnut, young chestnut, and flowers.
  • Taste the flavor: Good green tea has a refreshing, sweet flavor with a long-lasting aftertaste. It often has a "green bean soup" or "chestnut" flavor.
  • Brew the tea: Good green tea is durable and can be brewed multiple times without losing its flavor. The tea leaves retain their color and flavor even after repeated brewing.
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